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Crawford County Kalkaska County Roscommon County
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Crawford County

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 563 mi. 558 mi of it is land and 5 mi of it is water. The total area is 0.93% water. As of the census of 2000, there were 14,273 people, 5,625 households, and 4,038 families residing in the county.

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Grayling, Michigan
Grayling is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 1,952. It is the county seat of Crawford County. Grayling takes its name from the Grayling fish that was once prevalent in its lakes and streams.

Grayling is situated within Grayling Township, though it is politically independent. Interstate 75 passes just to the west of Grayling, and connects with the Mackinac Bridge at Mackinaw City 84 miles to the north and with U.S. Highway 127 just 4 miles south of the city. Michigan State Highway 72 passes east-west through the city and Michigan State Highway 93 is an 11-mile route connecting the main gate of Michigan Army National Guard's Camp Grayling, 4 miles southwest of Grayling, with Hartwick Pines State Park, 7 miles northeast of Grayling.



Kalkaska County

Kalkaska County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the population was 16,571. The county seat is Kalkaska. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 571 mi². 561 mi² of it is land and 10 mi of it is water. The total area is 1.71% water. As of the census of 2000, there were 16,571 people, 6,428 households, and 4,634 families residing in the county. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 571 mi². 561 mi² of it is land and 10 mi² of it is water. The total area is 1.71% water.

History: The first settler in Kalkaska County was an Englishman named William Copeland, who purchased land in the northwest corner of the county in 1855. The county was originally called Wabasee. The name Kalkaska is thought to be a Chippewa word meaning flat or burned-over country. Logging was the first important industry.

The discovery of substantial deposits of oil and natural gas resulted in the construction of a processing plant by Shell Oil Company in 1973 and a major economic boom in the community.

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Kalkaska, Michigan
Kalkaska is a village in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the village had a total population of 2,226. It is the county seat of Kalkaska County. The village has a total area of 2.5 mi². 2.5 mi² of it is land and 0.04 mi² of it is water. The total area is 0.79% water.

The town was platted in 1873 by A. A. Abbott and R. L. Thompson, who owned a sawmill, and who correctly anticipated the arrival of the railroad.

On July 5, 1908, a fire began in the middle of the business block and burned most of the stores. Local photographer E. L. Beebe made a number of photographs of the fire, and the resulting postcards were widely sold, and can still be found today.

In 1916, the noted author Ernest Hemingway visited and fished in Kalkaska, and later immortalized the town in his story "The Light of the World." A historical marker has been placed at the Rugg Pond Dam, on the Rapid River, where Hemingway reportedly fished one night from the power house. Oil and gas, manufacturing, and tourism are important industries in the village and surrounding county. Fisherman are attracted to Kalkaska by the many lakes and the Boardman, Rapid, and Manistee Rivers. Kalkaska has held the National Trout Festival in the last week of April each year since 1933. There is a giant statue of a rainbow trout in the town square.




Roscommon County

Roscommon County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the population was 25,469. The county seat is Roscommon. The county has a total area of 580 mi. 521 mi² of it is land and 58 mi² of it is water. The total area is 10.08% water. As of the census there were 25,469 people, 11,250 households, and 7,616 families residing in the county.

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Roscommon, Michigan
Roscommon is a village in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the village had a total population of 1,133. It is the county seat of Roscommon County6. The village is located in Higgins Township.




Higgins Lake

Higgins Lake is a large recreational and fishing lake in Roscommon County, in the U.S. state of Michigan. The 9,900 acre (40 km²) lake is known for its deep, clear waters and is the 10th largest in Michigan with a shoreline of 21 miles. It is named after Sylvester Higgins, Michigan's first chief of the topographical department of the Michigan Geological Survey. It has a maximum width of 4 miles and a length of 7 miles with a maximum depth of 135 feet. The mean depth is 44 feet and the lake contains almost 20 billion cubic feet (570 million cubic meters) of water. Its retention time is about 12.5 years. The lake's watershed covers 19,000 acres. The twin-lobed lake receives half of its water from submerged springs, 6% from incoming streams and the remainder from direct rainfall and runoff. It drains into Marl Lake by the Cut River which runs into Houghton Lake and eventually to Lake Michigan. A mere mile north of the lake, water flows into the Lake Huron watershed. Sports fish in the lake include perch, trout, smelt and pike and are taken both in open water and by ice fishing. Higgins Lake is considered a morphometrically oligotrophic lake, meaning that its large size causes it to appear and function as a nutrient-poor lake although it does receive a fair amount of nutrients.

Higgins Lake is also the name of the post office for the area, with ZIP code 48627. This ZIP code includes several other small communities and locales along the shores of the lake, including (moving counter-clockwise around the lake) Hillcrest, Lyon Manor, Detroit Park, Cook Corner, Sharps Corner, Almeda Beach, Oak Grove, Ritz Corner, Pine Bluffs, and Cottage Grove. Since all have Higgins Lake as a postal address, they are often all considered as part of the Higgins Lake community. The lake is situated on the boundary between Lyon Township on the west and Gerrish Township on the east.

There are two state parks, South Higgins Lake State Park, with a mile of shoreline, and North Higgins Lake State Park, located, as might be expected from the names, on opposite ends of the lake. Both provide public boat launches and camping, and are very popular in the summer months. The south park is older, larger, and more developed. The north park is located on what was once the world's largest seedling nursery, a part of the CCC of the 1930s.

Beginning in the early 1990s, Higgins Lake has been at the center of a state-wide debate in Michigan regarding the use of public road ends for the sunbathing, picnicking, lounging, and the placement of private hoists. Riparian property organizations include restricting use of road ends as part of a broader platform to limit public access to inland lakes in Michigan. These efforts are being challenged by proponents of public access including several state legislators who represent Roscommon County

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Houghton Lake

Houghton Lake is a large lake in Roscommon County. The unincorporated community of Prudenville is at the southeastern end of the lake, while the unincorporated community of Houghton Lake and Houghton Lake Heights is on the southwest and west shores. It is the largest inland lake in the state of Michigan, and one of the largest natural inland lakes in the United States (many man-made impoundments are much larger). The lake is approximately 7 1/2 miles (12 km) north to south, and about 4 1/2 miles (7 km) at it widest point. Houghton Lake has 30 miles (48 km) of total shoreline and its waters cover 20,044 acres (81 km²). It is an extremely popular resort and fishing area 12 months of the year. Houghton Lake is the site of Tip-Up-Town USA, a large ice fishing and winter sports festival with several events on the frozen waters of the lake itself. Houghton Lake is named after the first state geologist, Douglass Houghton who explored the area.

The lake receives the waters of Higgins Lake through the Cut River and, in turn, is the headwaters for the Muskegon River, which flows out of the North Bay in the northwest corner of the lake. The lake is partially within four townships: Markey Township on the northeast, Denton Township on the southeast, Roscommon Township on the southwest, and Lake Township on the northwest. The lake is mid to late mesotrophic in profile, and considered a warm water, shallow lake, with the average depth being 7 1/2 feet. The lake is a prolific fish factory, offering almost every species of game and panfish found in Michigan with the exception of the trout/salmon families, the sturgeon, and white bass. Common catches include northern pike, bluegill, walleye, crappie, yellow perch and largemouth bass.

Michigan State Highway 55 follows the southern shore, while U.S. Highway 27 passes just to the west. Michigan State Highway 18 and Interstate 75 pass just to the east.

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Information above has been provided by wikipedia

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